Thinking Third Party? The Bahamas Shows Us How

Originally published by Politic365 here. Politic365’s Justin Vélez-Haganspeaks with rising political star of the Bahamas, Mark Humes, on how third-party politics aren’t an impossibility anymore.  Listen to full interview here. “It’s just been […]

Originally published by Politic365 here.

Politic365’s Justin Vélez-Haganspeaks with rising political star of the Bahamas, Mark Humes, on how third-party politics aren’t an impossibility anymore. 

Listen to full interview here.

“It’s just been two parties in the past and both have . . . failed the people,” says Mark Humes, Chairman of the Democratic National Alliance (DNA) and candidate for parliament.

Sound familiar?

Much like here in the U.S., two parties have dominated the Bahamas’ political landscape for decades.  But unlike here, a new third party has emerged in the Bahamas that has the potential to take their national elections by storm.

According to the Chairman of their party, if your messaging is right, a third party in the U.S. can also achieve what they did in just ten months.

“We’re tapping into the youth of the nation.  We’re tapping into those who are unsatisfied with the way the government has been run,” says Humes.  “When you disregard the voice of the people, it’s not true democracy.  [We] come in as a balance, right up the center, and that’s what’s attractive to most.”

A sluggish economy has also hit the Bahamas pretty hard.  In order to fix the problem, the DNA is looking to its citizenry for input.  “We’re the only party in the history of Bahamian politics where we have had forums where citizens can be part of the Bahamian national development plan.”

Interesting concept.  But is it interesting enough to catch on here in the U.S.?

Listen to full interview here.